30 curse tablets found in Athenian well

Thirty lead curse tablets have been discovered at the bottom of an ancient well in Athens. The well was discovered the Kerameikos, ancient Athens’ main cemetery built in potters’ neighborhood (keramos means potter’s clay) northwest of the ancient center next to the Dipylon gate in the city wall. The vast site used to be crossed by the Eridanos river before it was channeled in the classical period when the city walls went up. Its previous meandering path was prime real estate for wells, and with fresh water in short supply in Athens, public and private wells were dug in the Kerameikos. In 2011, the German Archaeological Institute, which has been excavating the site since 1913, launched a research project to document, map and excavate the Kerameikos wells and more than 40 have been counted so far.

Well B 34 was discovered in the courtyard of the public bathhouse in front of the Dipylon. The round well shaft was built in the 4th century B.C. out of polygonal limestone blocks constructed in a corbelled technique — layers of rings that started out larger on the bottom and decreased in diameter as they rose to the top. The diameter at the bottom of the well is 9.5 feet. The diameter of the top is 3.6 feet. The well mouth was rimmed by a tufa stone, an unusual material for Greek well heads which were typically marble or white limestone.

Groundwater filled almost 23 feet of the depth of the well, making the job of excavation challenging. The team had to deploy four water pumps to clear the well shaft sufficiently to excavate. They found a wealth of objects at the bottom: clay lamps, talus bones (ie, knucklebones) for dice games, bronze coins, cooking pots, drinking vessels (skyphoi), vessels for mixing water and wine (kraters) and kadoi, two-handled, wide-mouthed pots used to draw water from the well. Some organic remains were preserved in the water-logged environment, including peach pits, a potter’s scraper and a small  wooden box.

One notable survivor is a fragment of the wooden guide roller disk, part of the keloneion, the swing beam mechanism that lowered and raised vessels for water collection. A finely carved cylindrical piece of Pentelic marble with the remains of a heavily corroded iron chain attached to its upper side that was found in the well was also part of the mechanism. It was a counterweight, connected to one side of a horizontal beam mounted through the crotch of a trunk or vertical pole. The earliest known representation of this mechanism is on an Attic black-figure Pelike now in Berlin’s Antikenmuseum. Dating to around 490 B.C., it depicts two women and a Satyr at a well where a man, perhaps a slave, is operating the keloneion.

This well was in use for almost a thousand years, believe it or not, with occasional periods of abandonment in the wake of wars like Sulla’s siege and burning of Athens in 86 B.C. or of plagues. The Slavic invasions of the late 6th century A.D. put a permanent end to its use as a well, which was probably for the best given how much lead had been soaking in there for 800 years or so.

The lead curse tablets date to its earlier years in the 4th century B.C. and after. Burying curses with the dead was common practice in the classical period. Thirty-five lead curses have been found in tombs excavated at the Kerameikos, with a particular concentration of them in the graves of children and those killed in war. The spirits of people who died suddenly or before their time were considered to hover around the burial place, ideal messengers to convey curses to the infernal gods.

Wells and sacred pools were also seen as a non-stop conveyance to the chthonic deities. The well of a public bathhouse, almost certainly in active use during the night as evidenced by the clay lamps found at the bottom, would have been a very convenient spot for mailing a curse to the gods below.

Waters in rivers and wells, both protected by nymphs, was believed to provide direct access to the underworld, as [excavation director Dr. Jutta] Dr. Stroszeck says. The belief was that throwing the curse into a well would activate it.

The 30 new tablets have been documented using reflectance transformation imaging, an digital technique that enables even the smallest inscriptions on lead to be read. The archaeologists hope to ultimately learn the name of the nymph, the nature of the curses and whether the targets of the hexes were any of the famous Athenians living in the city during the late fourth century B.C.E.

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24 Comments »

Comment by Robert Dormer
2020-02-07 04:37:39

You people have got to be the dumbest sex of crap on this planet. You have a piece of paper as a degree so your specialist apparently? Wrong! You miss from the very beginning when push exoteric nonsense instead of the esoteric that is meant for the members of these occult groups. WTF is wrong with you absolute idiots! It’s as if you are stuck in the religion of science and you cannot see what is plain as can be. Fools in every sense of the word. You should be embarrassed. I am embarrassed for you

 
Comment by Robert Dormer
2020-02-07 04:38:21

It’s a good thing you are trying to block every message that you don’t like you scumbags! You people have got to be the dumbest sex of crap on this planet. You have a piece of paper as a degree so your specialist apparently? Wrong! You miss from the very beginning when push exoteric nonsense instead of the esoteric that is meant for the members of these occult groups. WTF is wrong with you absolute idiots! It’s as if you are stuck in the religion of science and you cannot see what is plain as can be. Fools in every sense of the word. You should be embarrassed. I am embarrassed for you

 
Comment by Jim
2020-02-07 08:54:31

Look, Trevor, no cats.

 
Comment by Dr. E
2020-02-07 09:22:14

Dumping lead into the fresh water supply, now that’s a surefire way to curse the locals.

 
Comment by Cassandra
2020-02-07 15:35:31

Maybe no real cats, Trevor, but at least a cursed vulva, in ancient Greek referred to as ‘aidoion’, i.e. from ‘aidoioleiktes’ = cunnilingus (no idea, what this would be in English).

indeed, ‘Glykera’ seem to be the very first word in the upper left hand corner on the vulva tablet, and lead and other poison in fresh water is indeed not a very good combination.

 
Comment by Virginia
2020-02-07 16:52:15

When was lead finally discovered to be poisonous?

 
Comment by Alessandra Kelley
2020-02-07 19:33:03

We’ve known lead to be poisonous since the late nineteenth century.

The paint industry advertised lead as safe and necessary well into the twentieth century. I’ve seen chilling 1920s advertisements reassuring parents that lead was in most of their children’s toys. Since environmental lead affected the poor, especially poor children, the most there was little will to challenge the idea. By the 1950s it was obvious that lead was a very serious toxin with lifelong effects on people exposed to it, but even then responsibility for dealing with it was laid on the poor themselves rather than the paint and heavy metals industry or (except in limited circumstances) the government.

 
Comment by Albertus Minimus
2020-02-08 09:49:48

Over two millenia ago, the toxicity of lead was already fairly well known.

https://penelope.uchicago.edu/~grout/encyclopaedia_romana/wine/leadpoisoning.html

 
Comment by William Sherman
2020-02-08 14:55:38

It seems hard to believe our antecedents took that long to figure it out.

 
Comment by Ceit
2020-02-08 16:22:31

And then there was the lead in gasoline, which wasn’t banned entirely in the US until 1996.

 
Comment by Kronos
2020-02-09 05:26:06

alert(this should be filtered)

 
Comment by Jim
2020-02-11 12:54:19

In the family drinking well
Willie pushed his sister Nell.
She’s there yet, because it kilt’er.
Now we have to buy a filter.

-attributed to Harry Graham

 
Comment by Martin-L
2020-02-14 08:24:02

In some regions Germany, lead pipes were used for drinking water until the 70ies.They might be still in use in old buildings. Usually a layer of calcium diminishes contamination, but the level of lead are still not considered safe.

 
Comment by Trevor
2020-02-21 06:14:14

No cats, allegedly, Jim ;)

 
Comment by Hi you
2020-03-18 01:00:17

Huh? You mad, bro?

 
Comment by JCG
2020-03-18 18:03:41

There are still some houses with lead pipes in Flint, MI. That’s still causing troubles today.

 
Comment by Wolf
2020-03-19 00:48:19

Sir this is a Wendy’s.

 
Comment by Dom
2020-03-19 07:48:19

indeed very clever

 
Comment by SamIAm
2020-03-22 23:52:38

WTF is wrong with you? Seriously you aren’t making any sense. Slow down, and calm down.

 
Comment by Samuel
2020-03-29 19:41:39

You should probably proof read that. F minus.

 
Comment by Nikki
2020-05-07 01:23:36

:hattip: Sir. Are you lost? Do you need to feel special? Which occult or religion are you upset with today. We can figure this out. Oh wait. Your in the wrong place. Go whine somewhere else. Do you feel smart using esoteric and esoteric in the same sentence? Or did you just find out the mean of those words?

 
Comment by Steve B.
2020-05-07 11:52:20

Usually having a piece of paper, especially at higher levels, DOES indeed make you a specialist. It means you’ve had years of intensive study and put in hundreds of hours of work. But, since you’re so smart, Mr Robert Dormer, please enlighten us on your theories. And also please explain what a “sex of crap” is. Inquiring minds want to know.

 
Comment by Aaron O
2020-05-07 14:47:17

You sound like a complete crazy person. Not a single line of your rambling comment has made any sense and all of us are now dumber for having read it.

 
Comment by A
2020-05-07 15:42:27

Sex of crap?

 
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