Viking treasure pokes finder in Denmark

Søren Bagge had only been metal detecting for a couple of months in August of 2015. With no particular expertise, he picked a field near Lille Karleby on the Hornsherred peninsula of Zealand, Denmark, to scan just because he happened to have grown up nearby and so could easily stop at home for coffee breaks. The first couple of days he found a few Arabic silver coins. The next signal from his metal detector was weak too, but when he dug into the top soil, he found a small silver cup. He’d felt something pointy stabbing him as he was digging up the cup, so he suspected there was more to be found in the spot and rushed to alert the Roskilde Museum.

It was the weekend, though, and nobody was around to pursue his lead. Bagge put the cup back where he found it and reburied it to keep it safe until Monday. On Monday Roskilde Museum archaeologists did a small excavation on the spot. About a foot below the surface they encountered multiple artifacts and realized they had a Viking hoard on their hands. They removed the entire lot in a soil block to excavate it with careful deliberation in laboratory conditions.


Before excavating the soil block, archaeologists took it to Roskilde Hospital where it was CT scanned in the Radiology unit. The scan showed there were a great many artifacts encased in that soil block. It gave archaeologists a blueprint of how to proceed. There is video of the block’s arrival at the hospital and the scan. This video is in Danish, but you don’t have to understand what they’re saying to appreciate the excitement of the CT reveal.

The excavation revealed an exceptional treasure of 392 pieces. The silver cup Bagge found was one of two. There were 53 gilt bronze and silver pendants, more than 300 beads made of glass, amber, rock crystal and silver, 18 Arabic and Western European coins, a braided silver chain, a bracelet or arm ring with five smaller rings attached, elaborately decorated pieces from France, Eastern Europe and Ireland or Scotland. Some of the objects of Scandinavian manufacture were already antiques when they were buried in the second half of the 10th century.

I hesitate to play favorites with so many beautiful and important pieces, but the large ball penannular brooch, also known as a thistle brooch, is breathtaking. Penannular brooches were relatively common in the Viking era, but nothing like this one has been found in Denmark before. It’s Irish or Scottish and was made in the 10th century. It’s called a thistle brooch because it is decorated with three spheres in the shaving brush shape of the thistle bud. The brooch is large — 10 inches long — with a wicked long pin. It was that pin which poked at Søren Bagge when he was digging.

These large brooches were worn by elite men, high-ranking clerics and royal family members, with the pin facing upwards. There was a law on the books in Scotland that provided compensation for people who were accidentally stuck by long-pins. In a little historical irony, the reason the thistle is the national emblem of Scotland is that, according to legend, a barefoot Norse invader stepped on a thistle during an attempted nighttime raid on a Scottish army encampment. His cries of pain warned the Scots that the Vikings were coming and Scottish forces successfully repulsed the attack.

Another impressive import/pillaged piece in the hoard is a trefoil strap mount with acanthus decoration. This was a Frankish design which would later be copied in Scandinavia, only the Norse usually put stylized animal designs or geometric shapes inside the three leaves rather than the French acanthus motif. The French used trefoils as fittings on a sword strap. The Vikings converted them into a jewelry — belt buckles, brooches — and they’re usually discovered in women’s graves where there are no swords or any other weapons, for that matter. The Frankish style dates the piece to between the late 8th century and the 10th century.

Seven hollow silver beads in the hoard are of both Scandinavian and Slavic origin. The six largest, most elaborate beads decorated with rich filigree and showing the remains of gilding were probably manufactured in Poland or West Russia in the 9th or 10th century. They are very rare finds in Scandinavia. The seventh bead, on the other hand, is rounder with a silver spiral applique’ that is more typical of Scandinavian beads.

The bracelet or arm-ring with the rings attached is certainly a Scandinavian piece. The four smaller rings are closed with a knot, and the fifth and smallest ring is threaded through a heavy silver bead. The rings would have clinked together and chimed when the wearer moved her arm. Archaeologists think the design might represent Odin’s dwarf-forged gold ring, Draupnir (“the dripper” in Old Norse), which “dripped” eight rings of equal weight to the original every ninth night. In Norse mythology, it’s a symbol of fertility and prosperity.

As for the silver cup that started all of this, it and its companion are different. One is decorated with triangle designs close to the lip. One is plain. The decorated one is bigger and heavier than the plain one. Both were likely drinking goblets for the upper echelons of Norse society. Other Viking hoards also include silver cups, one larger and more ornamented than the other. Archaeologists think the uneven sets may have been used during important banquets or festivals where the honored guest would get to use the fancier cup and the host would take the plainer one. The style of the cups indicate they were made between 700 and 1000, but since the treasure was buried up to 50 or so years before the latter date, we can shave a few years off of that broad estimate.

The treasure went on display at the Roskilde Museum in December and is now in the National Museum for further study.

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9 Comments »

Comment by rita Roberts
2016-04-14 04:42:13

WOW What a fabulous discovery. Thanks for this post. !!

 
Comment by Preston McCullough
2016-04-14 04:49:43

I too, wish to discover a Viking horde!

 
Comment by Ragnar
2016-04-14 06:14:00

What does it say on those 18 Arabic and Western European coins ?

AD 801/802/810 – According to the contemporary “Royal Frankish Annals“, …

a (white) elephant by the name of ‘Abul Abaz’ was brought over from Baghdad by a certain ‘Isaac’, who himself had been sent to Harun al-Rashid (‘Aaron rex Sarracenorum’) on Charlemagne’s orders a couple of years earlier, to near Genoa in 801, and after the winter from there in 802 over the Alps to Aachen.

In AD 810, sadly, on a campaign intending to engage with King Godofrid of Denmark, poor ‘Abul Abaz’ suddenly died.

[801] Ipsius anni mense Octobrio Isaac Iudeus de Africa cum elefanto regressus Portum Veneris intravit; et quia propter nives Alpes transire non potuit, in Vercellis hiemavit.

[802] Ipsius anni mense Iulio, XIII. Kal. Aug., venit Isaac cum elefanto et ceteris muneribus, quae a rege Persarum missa sunt, et Aquisgrani omnia imperatori detulit; nomen elefanti erat Abul Abaz.

[810] … elefans ille, quem ei Aaron rex Sarracenorum miserat, subita morte periit :skull: .

 
Comment by James
2016-04-14 09:33:42

The workmanship on those thistle baubles is amazing! The craftsman was probably a young person with good eyes and a steady hand–I’m guessing it took a lot of file work, but those in the know can correct me.

 
Comment by Karlsdottir
2016-04-14 10:05:00

Lucky chap’s a dead ringer for Danny Willett, 2016 Masters winner.

 
Comment by Old Salt
2016-04-14 12:02:07

The photography,. and our ability to see the objects up close, is most appreciated, as are your descriptions – thank you!

 
Comment by Renee Yancy
2016-04-14 22:27:22

WOW! I wish I lived abroad – I would be out every spare moment with my metal detector.

 
Comment by CinTam
2016-04-14 22:37:20

Amazing!!! All of the finds are incredible, but that thistle brooch is stunning! Thanks for posting this.

 
Comment by Petrea Burchard
2016-04-14 23:42:05

As always, thank you for the high-res photos.

Gawk.

 
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