Icelandic goose hunters find Viking sword

Five friends on a goose hunting weekend in the Skaftárhreppur district near the Skaftá river in South Iceland, killed nary a single goose, but they did bag a Viking sword. It wasn’t even buried, but found on the surface of the soil. One of the hunting party, Runar Stanley Sighvatsson, said: “It was just there, waiting to be taken up.” That is probably the result of last year’s severe glacial floods eroding the old lava fields which had enveloped the sword for hundreds of years and carrying it to the field where it was found.

Runar Sighvatsson and another of the hunters, Árni Björn Valdimarsson, notified the Cultural Heritage Agency of Iceland of their find and on Monday delivered the sword to Kristín Sigurðardóttir, director of the Cultural Heritage Centre. Judging from a picture of the sword Valdimarsson had posted on his Facebook page, Sigurðardóttir estimated the weapon dated to the 10th century. Her initial examination confirmed that it is a type Q sword from 10th century, possibly the first half of the 10th century. She suspects the sword was probably buried in a grave.

The hunters came across it before it had been exposed for long, so while it is corroded, there’s a bend in the blade and the tip has broken off, all the parts are there and the sword is in excellent condition. There are even splinters of wood still attached to the handle.

“There might be some remains of scabbard on the blade but we will know more about this when the conservators have done a thorough search. The goose hunters that found the sword discovered another object which we have not analyzed yet,” [Sigurðardóttir] added.

“Our archaeologists have now gone to evaluate whether this [area] is a pagan grave.”

Finding a Viking sword anywhere is immensely exciting, but particularly so in Iceland where only 22 other Viking-era swords have been found. The last one was discovered more than 10 years ago.

The precise location of the find is being kept secret to keep treasure hunters away and give the agency the chance to explore the site for any other archaeological materials that might be there. Meanwhile the sword will go to the National Museum in Reykjavík for further study and conservation.

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5 Comments »

Comment by Grendel
2016-09-07 04:56:21

Dýre swyrd ómige þurhetone swá híe wið eorðan fæðm þúsend wintra þaér eardodon – A dear sword, rust bitten, as it with earth enveloped a thousend winters there grounded [Beowulf 3049; earth=lava].

 
Comment by karlsdottir
2016-09-07 07:38:37

I wonder what its name is.

 
Comment by dearieme
2016-09-07 14:06:06

Murderous, thieving Viking bastards!

Oh, I’m descended from them, you say.

What enterprising navigators those fine fellows were.

 
Comment by Cerelle Bolon
2016-09-07 22:31:38

Ah ha! Perspective! My DNA says that I am too.
And thanks, Grendel, for that fine quotation! Suits this sword perfectly!

 
Comment by JW
2016-10-04 20:28:47

Who goes hunting in Iceland in socks and sandals?

 
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