UofT acquires oldest English-language book in Canada

The University of Toronto’s Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library celebrated World Book Day today by announcing the acquisition of the Caxton Cicero. Printed in 1481, only four decades after the invention of the printing press in the West, the volume is believed to be the oldest English-language book in Canada, and it’s certainly the oldest in the library’s collection, eclipsing the previous record-holder (a copy of The Golden Legend printed by Caxton in 1507) by a quarter century.

William Caxton, the man who introduced movable type to England, included three translated Latin treatises in the untitled book: De Amicitia (“On Friendship”) and De Senectute (“On Old Age”) by Marcus Tullius Cicero, and De Nobilitate (“On Nobility”) by early 15th century humanist Giovane Buonaccorso da Montemagno the Younger. This was the first book by a classical ancient author to be translated into English, as well as the first Renaissance humanist author translated into English.

Unlike The Golden Legend, of which thousands of manuscripts and printed editions survive, there are only 13 known extant copies of the Caxton Cicero.

At the end of the first text, Caxton includes a colophon […], which is an imprint by the printer that includes information about the book’s publication.

The printed text states that the book is “imprinted by me simple person William Caxton into English at the pleasure, solace and reverence of men growing into old age.” The writing in ink below the statement is likely a person practising their handwriting, trying to emulate the type – likely from the end of the 15th century, says [interim head of rare books and manuscripts at Fisher Library, Pearce] Carefoote.

Through clues buried inside the book, one can trace the history of the Caxton Cicero back to one of its first owners, Thomas Shupton – thought to be a monk during the time of Henry VIII. It was then given to 16th-century politician Sir Robert Coke, who passed it on to his nephew. After his nephew’s death, the book was given to Sion College in London, which kept it until 1977 when it was bought by Mexican author Roberto Salinas Price through a rare book dealer.

U of T acquired the text from Price’s estate, which was made possible by many donors, led by the B.H. Breslauer Foundation and with the support from the University of Toronto through a matching grant.

In a random but satisfying numerological coincidence, it is the 15th millionth book in the Fisher Library collection. It will be of inestimable scholarly value to students of the classics, Renaissance, the history of the English language (Caxton’s publications were instrumental in establishing the primacy of the London dialect, standardizing English and spreading literacy), the physical object of the book and more. Library staff also plan to digitize the book so that it can be accessed by interested parties all over the world.

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5 Comments »

Comment by J. G'berg
2018-04-24 01:25:55

IoU 2 BH from UoT? :lol: — Aye, the virtualization of ‘movable types’ in the Digital Age is by no means an excuse not to economically make use of them – LOL

 
Comment by Michael Newcastle
2018-04-24 09:26:45

It beggars belief that a person in a Library of rare books could be so unthinking as to handle this tome with his bare hands! Shame on him! Where are the cotton gloves?

 
Comment by William Truderung
2018-04-24 11:58:19

@ Michael Newcastle:

The Robert Fisher Rare Book Library does not require any visitor to use gloves when handling books.

I have been there many times, and handled numerous old and rare books, manuscripts and documents, including a Shakespeare First Folio and a lengthy handwritten letter by Galileo, with my bare hands. Visitors are simply expected to use common sense, i.e. wash your hands after eating greasy foods, before handling the books.

 
Comment by William Truderung
2018-04-24 11:58:44

Michael Newcastle:

The Robert Fisher Rare Book Library does not require any visitor to use gloves when handling books.

I have been there many times, and handled numerous old and rare books, manuscripts and documents, including a Shakespeare First Folio and a lengthy handwritten letter by Galileo, with my bare hands. Visitors are simply expected to use common sense, i.e. wash your hands after eating greasy foods, before handling the books.

 
Comment by JoanP
2018-04-24 14:40:48

Michael,

Libraries generally no longer require white cotton gloves when examining rare or delicate books, having found that they may cause more damage than they prevent.

You might be interested in this article on the subject: https://www.betweenthecovers.com/articlesDetail.php?event_id=49

 
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