Celebrate the raising of the Vasa

It’s been 59 years since the pristine wreck of Vasa, the Swedish warship commissioned by King Gustav II Adolf which sank less than a mile from dock on her maiden voyage on August 10th 1628, was salvaged from Stockholm bay. It  broke the surface of the waters on April 24th, 1961, where, floating on pontoons, sprayed constantly with harbour water, it was excavated for five months. For 27 years it was conserved at a temporary location at the Wasa Shipyard. In 1988 it moved into the Vasa Museum and ever since then has been one of Stockholm’s most visited tourist destinations with more than one million visitors each year.

As the museum is closed for the time being, you can celebrate the anniversary with some teletourism. Here is the Vasa Museum’s Director of Research Fred Hocker talking about the complex salvage operation that raised the Vasa while simultaneously giving us a tour of the ship.

Next up, Hocker’s guided tour of the king’s cabin, or rather, a replica of it.

Museum guide Lisa orchestra of carved wooden putti in steerage. I’m embarrassed to say this is the first explanation I’ve heard of why the space was called steerage and I appreciate that a term now synonymous with the cheapest, least comfortable passage possible described the antechamber of the king on the Vasa.

In this video museum Educational Officers Lotta Wiker and Emilie Börefeldt explain how the Vasa was raised, illustrated with models of various stages of the salvage.

That’s just the tip of the contact iceberg. The Vasa Museum broadcasts live streaming video  of tours, stories, concerts from the museum every weekday at 4:28 PM, ie, 16:28, the year the ship was launched to its immediate demise. The broadcasts are live on Instagram and are also uploaded to the museum’s Facebook page. English-language videos air on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

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2 Comments »

Comment by Sharyn
2020-05-01 09:42:21

Thank you for sharing! If you can’t get to Stockholm, there is a stunning similar recovery in Kansas City Missouri https://www.1856.com/

 
Comment by Simon Leugfrisch von Hartenfels
2020-05-02 00:34:55

At last, …“Peace in Europe!!!”
— YT: watch?v=c-WO73Dh7rY

———-
PS: As it is the 380th anniversary: The “Swedish drink” was during the Thirty Years’ War a method of torture and execution in which the victim is forced to swallow large amounts of foul liquid. It was used to force peasants or town citizens to hand over money, food, animals, etc., or to extort sex from women.

 
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